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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
into the central square in cairo to call for an end to the new egyptian leader's regime. it was an enormous show of strength from the opposition that spent days blasting egypt he is new president, morsi. he upset just about everybody last week when he decided to give himself broad new powers that say his decisions don't need approval from any court. essentially he's above the law. really no different than a dictator. protests showed their across the country, some of them violent. street fighting this between demonstrators and police. president morsi tried to calm the criticism by promising to reserve his new powers for only the most important decisions. but that didn't appease the protesters. remember, just last week, the united states was publicly praising president morsi when he helped end the conflict between israel and gaza. the white house says president obama has not spoken to his egyptian counterpart since then and today the press secretary jay carney said basically the egyptians need to work this out themselves. there is no evidence that will happen any time soon. right now this enormous
has more from cairo. >> yeg, some dramatic developments here in cairo. egypt's president trying to expand his own powers dramatically, saying that any of his presidential decrees issued since he took office six months ago cannot be overturned by anybody, including the courts. and that those previous officials who could be implicated in murdering demonstrators during the revolution a year ago would be retried. as one morsey opponent put it, he is basically putting himself above the having no one to check his powers. we have seen street protests. those protests could grow dramatically with these new announcements by the egyptian president. it comes on the heels of a real diplomatic success in the world spotlight here. president morsey helping to negotiate a cease-fire between israel and hamas. really, making the unusual step of receiving praise from all sides from u.s. officials from hamas, even from some israeli officials for his pragmatism but certainly that imagine that tism in its own rule here could be put to the test almost immediately. with new decrees expanding his power,
's call of duty, heading up to capitol hill to broker a debt deal. dagen: u.s. embassy closed in cairo amid protests, of bid muhamed morsi's power grab. connell: can you hear me now syndrome, wireless carriers are ranked on their performance. we will have the worst and the best. dagen: stocks now lend every 15 minutes, nicole petallides at stock exchange with economic news this morning. is that what is giving the market a lift? nicole: we have a lot going on here. we have jobless claims for the second week, that is good news, you saw growth in economy and in the last few moments we moved higher and we are positive for the week. when you check it out and industrials we are up 44 points and most of those names on the dow are in the green, names like hewlett-packard and caterpillar and bank of america and united healthcare doing well. the fiscal cliff headline after headline continues to be in the forefront and on everybody's mind that this is what we are seeing, a decent market and the u.s. dollar being weaker today has been a factor in the strength we are seeing as well. connell: treasu
transpired in cairo. as a consequence of the video. >> reporter: and right after that, during that news briefing that we heard, we heard from actually senator lindsey graham, senator kelly ayotte and senator john mccain, all of them stating those comments are completely wrong. senator graham going so far to say, people don't bring mortars, grenades to spontaneous demonstrations. think basically wanted to know why ambassador rise in the first place, went on public television, went on television on five sunday morning talk programs five days after the september 11th attacks and failed to give an adequate definition of what took place there. that is what they're drilling down trying to find out. they are left more troubled it seems with ambassador rice's comments. jenna: kelly, how did this meeting come about the? was it requested by the senators? was it something the ambassador wanted to do? how did it come about today? >> reporter: you look at backdrop, senator john mccain said he would welcome any meeting with ambassador rice. she initiated this. ambassador rice emerged as you know as f
, secretary of state clinton will fly to cairo, egypt to meet with prime minister morsi that has been holding peace talkings. >> brian: yesterday we are talking about peace talk and hear a cease fire kicking in and we know it department happen and the bombing didn't stop. and this, this morning lerand viter is in tel aviv where a bomb went off in the city. leland. >> i am setting the scene for you on my israeli answer to the pentagon. a city threw a bomb on to the bus or left one it is not a suicide bomber, but 10 people were injured. three of them very seriously wounded here in this attack. the two suspects on the list would be hamas or islamic jihad, both operating out of the gaza strip. hamas is peace talks and trying to figure out if a cease fire over israel with the rockets and the bombings on the other side going into the gaza strip . islamic jihad has a different agend a. they are backers in iran who are pushing for rocket fire against the gaz strip. we should have a shot up of this on our live view, you can actually see this bus that stopped. this harkens back to the days of the secon
plan to stage a massive demonstration tomorrow. holly williams is in cairo and has been watching this whole crisis unfold. >> reporter: a week after president mohamed morsi gave himself broad new powers that some egyptians say make him a dictator in all but name his islamist allies have rushed to finish a final draft of the country's constitution. it could now be put to a referendum before the end of the year. protests and violent clashes in cities across egypt, president morsi defended his power grab last night on egyptian state tv. he said his new authority is needed to guide egypt through its democratic transition and that he will give up his expanded powers once the country has a new constitution. a final draft of the constitution is now complete, written and voted on by a panel dominated by president's morsi's political allies, neither all of them islamists. the constitution gives islamic sharia law a more specific role in government and doesn't guarantee women's equality. it also empowers the state to defend morals and values. critics like human rights lawyer say that could
prince of qatar and cairo. even the tunisian prime minister that's visited gaza, and this is a muslim brotherhood president who has very close ties to hamas and, therefore, he is a valid interlocuture. >> i don't think they want to see a ground war or an extension of this conflict because it will destabilize an already destabilized region, especially considering what's happening in syria. >> ambassador let's talk about israeli politics as former ambassador to israel, you know the political system there well. we just finished our election. there's an election coming up in january. how much of this could possibly be the prime minister showing the strength of his administration as he stands there at the boarder? >> i think there's an element of that. i think the first thing is the fact that the rockets, especially the rockets that have a range of about 45 to 46 miles and that can come close to even tel aviv, that that is the immediate catalyst for this operation, but there's no doubt that prime minister netanyahu see some political utility in showing a hard line to protect israel's natio
, but it's in many of the papers this morning, angry protesters filling tahrir square in cairo. they're stepping up pressure for their president to rescind a decree that they say threaten the nation with a new era of autocracy. there's the picture on the front page of the washington times. we will be talking about this on sunday on the washington journal. back to the phone calls. john in san jose, california, independent. caller: thanks so much for having me. good morning. i have a really good friend who's a teacher at a high school we attended when we were in high school. one of the things she complains about the most is just how rigid the system is. really, i think it's ironic that we continue to say teachers are important, although teachers for the most part are not in charge of their own profession. the system should be a little bit more organic in the sense that if a teacher has a great idea she can rally real talent her or him. the other of thing i wanted to share is there's a whole system within the system that provides individualized education plans to students who have speci
reporting from the front lines. protesters took to the streets of cairo today after mohamed morsi basically stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping presidential powers and eliminate the judiciary. demonstrators called on morsi to roll back his decree or resign. at least one person died in clashes with police. demonstrators stormed the headquarters of a party backed by morsi's muslim brotherhood. a spokesman said the building was destroyed, dozens of injuries. >>> 213-foot crane caught fire, it partially collapsed. this was on to a university building in sidney today. the crane was carrying 264 gallons of diesel fuel, flames went 32 feet into the air. no one was injured according to the operator lend lease. i wanted to mention that name because it might sound familiar. it is the same company that operated the crane that partially collapsed in new york city during superstorm sandy. the company is still in the process of reviewing that incident. >>> well, for the first time since his arrest two years ago, bradley manning is expected to take the stand in a pretrial hearing this week. no
injuries reported. secretary of state clinton is in jerusalem and she goes to cairo today. this is "varney & company," an all star, pre-holiday lineup. here we go.  >> top story. the unions are excertifying maximum pressure right now the at worst possible time. people want to shop and unions are making both difficult. sciu expects more than a thousand marches at los angeles international airport and say the company they work for, a contractor for the airport broke the union and took away health insurance and demonstrating. and protests planned at o'hare in chicago. a new company providing custodial services there, nonunion, protests. and a strike, and another one at the port in portland. and a huge protest planned at one thousand wal-mart stores on friday. workers angry about wages and benefit and threaten to tie up wal-mart parking lots on what is a crucial shopping day and hostess, the bakers union refusing to make a deal and now the company is going to be liquidated. yes, it is, 18,000 jobs or thereabouts lost, and unions throwing their weight around this holiday week. if you don't w
directly with terrorist organizations. then it's off to cairo and a meet with president morsi because it is the egyptian president that is the liaison if you will in these talks with hamas. the goal here is to create space, buy time to try to see if they can prevent israel from doing a full-fledged ground invasion. seeing if they can get some sort of temporary cease-fire to create room for a more negotiated settlement. shuttle diplomacy is back. >> what about the risk/reward. if she accomplishes something, then that's a great feather in her cap and the administration's. but if she doesn't, does she come off as being ineffective? >> well, there is a risk to this. i talked to the white house aides. i said, look, are you sendinger in because you think there's something precooked that they have a possibility of basically pushing this over the finish line, getting it done and they admitted they're not there. they do feel as if it is needed to sort of nudge things along. you are right, politically, this could be a great way for secretary clinton to finish her four-year tenure at the state d
employee keeping the office open. and when something really big happens in cairo, when something really big happens in mexico city, in beijing, in hong kong, what you do is you ship in one of the star correspondents, or even an anchor. but the difference between covering the news, year after year after year in a country, maybe even learning the language, certainly getting to know the people, getting to know who the movers and shakers are, and what the political dynamic in that country is, that really is not happening much anymore. and parenthetically, what's happening in our business is also happening over in the intelligence field, at the cia. where quite literally -- >> i don't want to go too far there. we're -- i want to talk to you about the role of cable television. which you touched on before. in a recent interview with bill o'reilly of fox, you've derided ideological coverage of the news, bad for america, you said, making it difficult if not impossible for congress to reach across the aisle and find compromise. you also wrote an op-ed piece, this is not good for the republic. what do
on the mississippi river are going to be so shallow between st. louis, missouri, and cairo, illinois, and then on top of that because of rock tentacles between red tower and theebs, illinois, that river traffic may come to a halt on the mississippi river. and that means there's going to be millions of tons of commodities that are not going to be able to be transported north and south on that river. and of course that affects not only the recipients of those commodities, and the shippers of those commodities, but in directly -- indirectly people who mine, make, manufacture, supply those commodities. and so this potentially can have a dramatic impact and negative way on the economy of our country at a time when we are trying to stimulate the economy, create more jobs, and make sure that we do not throw ourselves back into a recession. now, in november, early november, and even toward the end of october, over 15 united states senators, around 65 members of the house of representatives, five or six governors of various states have written letters to president barack obama, major philip may, regional admi
egypt. and that's really the key. she'll go to cairo. egypt is playing the crucial role in this. that new government of mohamed morsi who himself is a member of the muslim brotherhood. there's a lot of sympathy in egypt for hamas. but on the other hand, egypt does want to play a constructive role because they know that they need the help of the united states, the help of the eu, the help of the international community for their economy. so it's a very delicate type of balance. hillary clinton knows the players. she's met several times with benjamin netanyahu. she's met with mahmud abbas, and she really knows the issues, so she's the perfect person to do it. >> jill, it is speculation, but it seems to me that the secretary of state would not be on her way to the middle east at this moment if a ground invasion were imminent. that is not a split-screen picture that the u.s. would like to see, no doubt. but as you said, a lot of what she'll be doing is working the allies. that's what the president's been doing, on the phone with turkey, egypt, countries in the region trying to stabi
in cairo as we speak. we have been deeply involved in helping to stand them up, and we are going to carefully consider what more we can do. i will be having much more to say about that as we move toward the friends of the syrian people meeting in morocco in the second week of december. no other decisions have been made yet, but we consider them on an almost daily basis. at the united states has provided more than $200 million in humanitarian assistance -- syrian people who weapon displaced are facing difficult conditions given the winter that is upon them. this remains a very difficult situation to manage because there are so many interests by all of the players, many of which are contradictory. turkey, for example, is very much at the leadership level, committed to seeing the end of the syrian regime, but incredibly worried that not enough will be done that empowers the kurds, particularly the pkk affiliates. jordan is working hard to maintain stability inside its own country. they are obviously worried about upsetting the delicate demographic balance inside. lebanon has tried v
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)